"My purpose behind the work is to question and find understanding in the craziness, tragedy, vulnerability, beauty and power of mankind." CLR

Christy Lee Rogers is a visual artist from Kailua, Hawaii. Her obsession with water as a medium for breaking the conventions of contemporary photography has led to her work being compared to Baroque painting masters like Caravaggio. Boisterous in color and complexity, Rogers applies her cunning technique to a barrage of bodies submerged in water during the night, and creates her effects naturally in-camera using the refraction of light. Through a fragile process of experimentation, she builds elaborate scenes of coalesced colors and entangled bodies that exalt the human character as one of vigor and warmth, while also capturing the beauty and vulnerability of the tragic experience that is the human condition. 

Rogers’ works have been exhibited internationally from Paris, London, Mexico City to Shanghai, Sao Paulo, Los Angeles and more, and are held in private and public collections throughout the world. She has been featured in International Magazines, including Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar Art China, Elle Decoration, Global Times, The Independent, Casa Vogue, Photo Technique, Photo Korea and others. Rogers’ "Reckless Unbound" is currently housed at Longleat House in the UK; the stately home, which is the seat of the Marquesses of Bath and also home to Renaissance gems of the Italian masters, like Titan’s "Rest on the Flight into Egypt."  Rogers' art has been featured on several album covers, and in 2013, her images were selected for the 2013–2014 performance season of the Angers-Nantes Opera in France. Although she mainly still shoots in Hawaii, Rogers currently lives in Nashville, TN, where she also spends her time as a mother, filmmmaker, and musician. 

The Independent, London - Jan 6, 2013 - Adam Jacques
"The ethereal payoff is indeed redolent of a mix of Masters – the vivid hues of Titian, the straining bodies of Rubens, the sun-dappling chiaroscuro of Caravaggio, but also the loose brushstrokes and fluid movement of Delacroix; hints, too, of the Tiepolo-esque heavenly ascents adorning many an 18th-century Venetian chapel.

Yet, for all these highfalutin qualities, Rogers' subjects were no gods, kings or mythical beasts, but rather her friends, whom she coaxed to writhe around in a local swimming pool – a simplicity that reflects both her method (the pictures are entirely undoctored) and the purity of Rogers' lifelong love of the water.”

"What I want more than ever is to express and inspire hope and freedom, a sense of wonder and tranquility, to create a safe place to dream wildly, and most importantly to inspire the idea that there are still mysterious, impossibly beautiful things on Earth—not solely in our imaginations."  CLR

"It can be dangerous at times because the water is unforgiving; it seeps in the nostrils, it’s cold and has a life of it’s own.  You move where it wants you to move, and the fabrics dance at their own pace.  For the models, being under water shuts off the excessive thought process that we all have going on in our heads, which is wonderful because it allows them to really be themselves completely. “  CLR